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Saturday, July 25, 2020 | History

3 edition of Reproductive health hazards in the workplace found in the catalog.

Reproductive health hazards in the workplace

Reproductive health hazards in the workplace

  • 198 Want to read
  • 38 Currently reading

Published by Science Information Resource Center in Philadelphia .
Written in English

    Places:
  • United States.
    • Subjects:
    • Reproductive toxicology.,
    • Reproductive toxicology -- United States.,
    • Industrial toxicology -- United States.,
    • Abnormalities -- etiology.,
    • Carcinogens, Environmental -- adverse effects.,
    • Occupational Diseases.,
    • Reproduction -- drug effects.,
    • Teratogens.

    • Edition Notes

      StatementOffice of Technology Assessment task force, Louise A. Williams ... [et al.].
      ContributionsWilliams, Louise A., United States. Congress. Office of Technology Assessment.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsRA1224.2 .R47 1988
      The Physical Object
      Paginationxiv, 422 p. :
      Number of Pages422
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL2396738M
      ISBN 10039753003X
      LC Control Number87026518

      in reproductive risk assessment; risk management is the subject of chapter 7. Ethical issues sur-rounding the difficulty of separating value judg-ments from the risk assessment process are dis-cussed in the background paper, EthicalIssues in Reproductive Health Hazards in the Workplace, prepared for this report (see appendix F). Several. For a review of the operation of these systems in the area of occupational reproductive health hazards, see Office of Technology Assessment Reproductive Health Hazards in the Workplace (). Nancy Gertner’s position paper, “Interference With Reproductive Choice,” in this book, addresses some of the problems in this area. Google ScholarCited by: 6.

      Health Hazards. All chemicals we use can potentially cause harm to our health so its very important that we understand what that hazards are and how to prevent exposure. There are four main classes of health hazard namely corrosive, toxic, harmful and irritant. Since women bear children, reproductive hazards are often considered a woman's problem. However, reproductive health means more than having healthy babies; men also experience reproductive disorders, such as impotence, decreased sperm count, and defective sperm.

      - Occupational health and safety ought not to be regulated because it interferes with the freedom of individuals to choose the kind of work that they want to perform - Employees assume the risk of work can be challenged on several grounds 1. Workers need to possess a sufficient amount of info about the hazards involved 2. Reproductive hazards can affect the reproductive function of women or men or the ability of couples to conceive or bear healthy children In women treated with antineoplastic drugs, adverse effects have been reported including damage to ovarian follicles, decreased ovarian volume, and ovarian fibrosis resulting in amenorrhea and menopausal Cited by:


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Reproductive health hazards in the workplace Download PDF EPUB FB2

Reproductive Hazards of the Workplace is designed to help managers, primary care physicians, and health and safety professionals manage and prevent occupational reproductive risks. Like other entries in Van Nostrand Reinhold's Hazards of Reproductive health hazards in the workplace book Workplace series, the book offers a wealth of valuable, up-to-date information plus expert-tested.

The Effects of Workplace Hazards on Male Reproductive Health. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Publication No. (). Identifies steps to reduce or prevent workplace exposure to reproductive hazards.

Reproductive Health Hazards in the Workplace, a book published by the U.S. Congress, Office of Technology Assessment, is another useful reference.

13 x U.S. Congress, Office of Technology Assessment. Reproductive Health Hazards in the Workplace. GPO, ; Cited by: 4. Reproductive Health Hazards in the Workplace by Office of Technology Assessment Task Force A copy that has been read, but remains in clean condition.

All pages are intact, and the cover is intact. The spine may show signs of wear. @article{osti_, title = {Reproductive hazards of the workplace}, author = {Sever, L.E.}, abstractNote = {Concern regarding adverse effects of occupational exposures on the reproductive health of workers is increasing.

Several sociopolitical and legal issues influence both the regulation of worker exposure and the ability to study exposure and possible reproductive effects. Reproductive health hazards in the workplace. Philadelphia: Science Information Resource Center, (OCoLC) Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Louise A Williams; United States.

Congress. Office of Technology Assessment. Reproductive Hazards in the Workplace is ideal for pregnant women or women planning to become pregnant in the near future who are now in the workplace and who are concerned about health risks.

Union stewards, occupational health and women's health specialists, and personnel department officers of corporations may also find this timely book to Cited by: 2. Substances or agents that affect the reproductive health of women or men or the ability of couples to have healthy children are called reproductive hazards.

Radiation, some chemicals, certain drugs (legal and illegal), cigarettes, some viruses, and alcohol are exam-ples of reproductive haz-ards. This pamphlet focuses on reproductive hazards in File Size: KB. Request PDF | Reproductive Hazards in the Workplace | This chapter discusses various researches on occupational reproductive health hazards.

Numerous epidemiologic studies have been conducted on. COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle.

Reproductive Hazards of the Workplace is designed to help managers, primary care physicians, and health and safety professionals manage and prevent occupational reproductive risks. Like other entries in Van Nostrand Reinhold's Hazards of the Workplace series, the book offers a wealth of valuable, up-to-date information plus expert-tested Price: $ Reproductive Hazards Workplace Hazards of the Workplace: : Frazier, Hage: Books.

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As everybody understands, book Reproductive Hazards Of The Workplace, By Linda M. Frazier, Marvin L. Hage is popular as the home window to open the globe. It means that reviewing book Reproductive Hazards Of The Workplace, By Linda M. Frazier, Marvin L. Hage will offer you a brand-new method to locate every little thing that you require.

Workplace Risk Assessment for Reproductive Hazards Article (PDF Available) in Archives of Environmental and Occupational Health 69(2) April with Author: Tee Guidotti. Reproductive Hazards in the Workplace aids working women in making important decisions about pregnancy and job-related health problems.

It gives women a standard for judging their work situations, shows how they might improve them, and, armed with increased knowledge, how they might seek to improve working conditions for all pregnant women.4/5(1). Worker health and safety in nail salons is covered by the Occupational Safety and Health Act.

However, due to their small size and the belief that salons do not have significant health hazards, few have been inspected.

Injust 18 nail salons were inspected by the OSHA (Roelofs et al., ). In the United States, a total ofnail Cited by: Reproductive Health Hazards in the Workplace, a book published by the U.S.

Congress, Office of Technology Assessment, is another useful reference. 13 This report briefly reviews reproductive biology and development and selected chemical, physical, and biological agents that are real or suspected workplace hazards to reproductive function.

In Cited by: 4. This book, a hard copy reprint of the report prepared by the Science Information Resource Center in response to a congressional request, is an excellent background document.

It attempts to catalog all types of environmental hazards—chemical, physical, and biological—that are thought to have deleterious effects on the human reproductive Author: Harold J. Magnuson. The novel describes the hazards of working in the circus during the Depression.

The Whip. Karen Kondazian () A great book about a woman who lives as a man and becomes a famous stagecoach driver. Inspired by a true story, the novel shows the lack of opportunity (in the workplace and otherwise) available to women in the ’s. Working. Reproductive hazards were defined as substances which have an effect on the ability to produce healthy children.

These included radiation, various chemicals, drugs, cigarettes, and heat. At the workplace several substances have been identified as hazardous to the reproductive system including lead ().

Reproductive health hazards in the workplace.Reproductive hazards may soon become a major focus of workplace health and safety. This article explores the principal regulatory and legal mecha-nisms available to reduce the level of exposure to reproductive hazards in the workplace, and emphasizes the steps that workers can take to set those mechanisms into motion.Global conversations about reproductive health in the workplace are changing.

Amid increasingly urgent concerns surrounding the equal protection of workers, some occupational safety and health (OSH) professionals are taking steps to close the significant gaps in the industry’s understanding of how to support a large employee population: parents.